Interview with a Deported Migrant

Nigeria is such a blessed country, having an amazing diversity of culture, tribes, languages, people etc. I had always been aware of some striking facts about the three major tribes. For example, historically, the Hausa-Fulanis, who are the largest tribe, are the most experienced at national leadership. The Yorubas who rank second highest in population are well-known for their emphasis on and the priority given to education. It’s therefore not surprising that they have the best developed infrastructure of the top three. The Igbos, who are next in demographic dominance, are the most industrious and widespread around the country and around the world. As a Nigerian who has traveled to more than 20 out of the 36 states in the country, I can testify to the richness of our diversity.

During the day, I had a discussion, with someone I’d call Richard that revealed more about the country. He works as a security personnel at the organization where I am also employed. This interview is about the Benin people whose home is in Edo state, southwestern Nigeria.

Richard: I grew up in Benin, Edo state and it a thing of pride among us when you say you have traveled overseas. The passion we have for traveling is such that if a Benin guy is given a visa to live in Europe a few weeks before completing his PhD dissertation, he might prefer to drop out of the PhD program in his excitement to take advantage of the new opportunity. About 12 years ago, I traveled to Spain through Morocco. It was a very risky journey and many people died on the way. The deaths were not only due to sickness or the severity of environmental conditions. They were sometimes due to fellow migrants taking advantage of weaker ones. Sometimes, after some migrants ran out of personal supplies, they attacked others, who were better equipped, to steal their money and food.
VOL: How long did you spend in Spain?
Richard: About 3 months.
VOL: Why did you come back so quickly?
Richard:We were caught and deported.
VOL: So what did you do for a living while you were in Spain?
Richard: Nothing at all. We spent all the time hiding from the police. After we were brought back, I was determined to return shortly. However, I had seen some people die in the process of hustling who left nothing behind as a legacy. So I decided to get married and have, at least, a child before returning. I thought that in case things don’t go as planned, I will have raised a family.
VOL: It appears that you never went back.
Richard: My wife prevailed on me to not leave her and the kids alone; so I never went back.

Therefore, we may be safe to say that the Benin people have an unusual passion for international travel and could risk their lives to satisfy this craving. Who knows whether some of them are among the many who die on migrant boats on the Mediterranean? It’s time for the new government leaders to be led by General Buhari who will be sworn in later today to make the country conducive for all categories of people to be guaranteed an economic future. This way, the loss of lives in the search for better prospects overseas will be significantly minimized.

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Grace

Grace Grace gives you pardon

When you deserved punishment

Grace gives favour

Where you did not labour

Grace makes you a winner

When you’d have been a quitter

Grace dries your tears

When you were limited by fears

Grace gives you hope

When in darkness men left you to grope

I thank God for his grace. I am a product of God’s grace and undeserved mercies. What else can grace do? How has grace helped you in life? Please share in the comments :).

Leke Babayomi blogs at lekebabayomi.wordpress.com Follow him on twitter @lekebabayomi Brace yourself to purchase a copy of his soon-to-be-released book: “The Silent Killer.”

You’re Due for Another Job

You’re due for another job when you usually find yourself checking Facebook without caring whether the work is done or not.
You’re due for another job when your friends think you’re on vacation because you post selfies on instagram  during working hours.
You’re due for another job when you usually have a fever on Sunday night.
You’re due for another job when time always moves so slowly during working hours.
You’re due for another job when you’re convinced that your job is boring.
You’re due for another job when your motivation to show up at work is to secure your month-end pay
You’re due for another job when your boss always reminds you about simple tasks you’re yet to complete.
You’re due for another job when everyone now thinks you’re stupid and incompetent.
You’re due for another job when you do not see the value it is adding to your future.
You’re due for another job when you’re repeatedly consoling yourself that your present position pays the bills.
You’re due for another job when your juniors become your bosses.
You’re due for another job when you lack interesting office experiences to share with your spouse or friends.
You’re due for another job when all you can say about your 9hrs at work is ‘my day was ok.’
You’re due for another job when your work  makes you a stranger to your spouse  and children.
You’re due for another job when you can no longer make time for family and friends.
You’re due for another job when your work lacks fresh challenges.
You’re due for another job when your happiest moment in the week is Friday evening and your worst moment is Sunday night or Monday morning.
You’re due for another job when it takes eternity to  figure out the solution to easy problems.
You’re due for another job when you find yourself saying or thinking , ‘I hate this job’.
You’re due for another job when you’re stuck at the same earning level for several years running.
You’re due for another job when you can no longer plan your expenses because you’re being owed several months salaries.
You’re due for another job when your spouse suggests it several times.
You’re due for another job when you cannot apply the skills from the present  job elsewhere.
You’re due for another job when your lifestyle is bigger than your boss’ own.
You’re due for another job when most of your colleagues are disgruntled. Why remain with a bunch of unhappy people?
You’re due for another job when you seem to be the smartest one around. It’s obvious you’re among the wrong set of people and you might soon begin to over-estimate your capability.
You’re due for another job when you’re the only superstar that hardly ever gets challenged by any other person.
You’re due for another job or position when your boss’ job is under threat because of your competence.

You’re due for another job when at least five of the situations described fit your circumstances. Please don’t continue to endure your present job in the hope that it will improve. A change is what can rescue you. You may change your responsibilities within the present organization or make a move to get hired by another employer that fits your career goals. However, if you have reached a point of abhorrence for working to make other companies rich, you may opt to start your own business. But the bottom line is DO SOMETHING!

Do you know other signs that indicate that a person is due for another job? Feel free to add them to the comments :).


Leke Babayomi blogs at lekebabayomi.wordpress.com

Follow him on twitter @lekebabayomi

Brace yourself to purchase a copy of his soon-to-be-released book: “The Silent Killer.”

Being Poor

Some people can write sha 🙂

Whatever

Being poor is knowing exactly how much everything costs.

Being poor is getting angry at your kids for asking for all the crap they see on TV.

Being poor is having to keep buying $800 cars because they’re what you can afford, and then having the cars break down on you, because there’s not an $800 car in America that’s worth a damn.

Being poor is hoping the toothache goes away.

Being poor is knowing your kid goes to friends’ houses but never has friends over to yours.

Being poor is going to the restroom before you get in the school lunch line so your friends will be ahead of you and won’t hear you say “I get free lunch” when you get to the cashier.

Being poor is living next to the freeway.

Being poor is coming back to the car with your children in the back seat, clutching…

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Baltimore.

The pattern of discrimination and abuse that has resulted in the death of blacks in recent times is disturbing. This writeup strikes a chord with me.

yesivebeenthere2

I’m not black, and I’ve never been persecuted for my skin color. But. I know what it’s like to endure years of unrelenting abuse at the hands of power.

If you’ve never experienced it, if your mind can’t grasp the scale, then maybe this personal story will help you understand.

My mother beat the shit out of me from 3 to 13. CRUNCH! There’s no suitable onomatopoeia for the sound of an adult’s hand belting a child across the face. There’s no word that describes what it’s like to feel your cartilage ring. She’d backhand me across the face for nothing, out of nowhere. She’d beat me with whatever was handy — spoon, belt, hand — and she’d always scream at me that it was my fault. I made her do it. There was always a reason, always a transgression. “You’re only hurting yourself!” CRACK!

By the time I was…

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